866.229.0927
9am - 9pm EST | 7 Days/Week

  Home > Heirloom Seeds > Heirloom Vegetable Seeds >

  Onion: Yellow Sweet Spanish Onion (500mg, 140 seeds)
Heirloom Yellow Sweet Spanish Onion Heirloom Seeds | Grow Yellow Sweet Spanish Onions


 
Our Price : $1.50


Availability: Ships in less than 24 hours!
Product Code: 15YSPO
Qty:

Description More Information
 
A large-yielding heirloom variety that produces large sweet onions – sometimes weighing in excess of a pound each.

A great hamburger onion! Average: 115 days

Detailed planting instructions:

Can be direct-seeded, grown from transplants started inside, or from sets -- small bulbs about ½-inch in diameter grown from seed the previous season.

Choose a weed-free, well-drained location. Raised beds are ideal. Onions are good for intercropping with other garden plants, especially early-maturing spring greens. Do not plant where other onion family crops have been grown in the past 3 years.

Direct-seeding in the garden may not allow enough time for long-season varieties to mature, but is fine for shorter-season varieties or for scallions - onions harvested before the bulb forms.

Direct-seed in spring when the soil reaches 50 F. Plant seed ¼ inch deep, ½ inch apart, in rows 12 to 18 inches apart. Thin to 4-inch spacings for large bulbs, 2-inch spacings for smaller bulbs but higher yields, or 1-inch spacings for scallions.

Start transplants inside about 8 to 10 weeks before last frost date. Plant 4 or 5 seeds in each cell, or seed in flats ¼ inch deep and ½ inch apart. If tops grow too tall and begin to droop, trim back to about 3 inches tall with scissors. After hardening off, transplant 2 to 4 weeks before last frost date. Space 4 inches apart for large bulbs, 2 inches apart for smaller bulbs, or 1 inch apart for scallions.

From sets: Choose bulbs no larger than ¾ inch in diameter. Large bulbs are more prone to bolting. Plant sets about 1 inch deep 2 to 4 weeks before last frost date. Space 4 inches apart for large bulbs or 2 inches apart for smaller bulbs.

Onions have shallow root systems and need consistent moisture and good weed control. Water weekly if weather is dry, and mulch to retain moisture and suppress weeds.


HARVESTING

You can always tell when onions have stopped growing. The leaves will lose their color, weaken at the top of the bulb and flop over. Each year a few new gardeners watch the leaves die and wonder, "What's wrong?" There's nothing wrong; it's Nature's plan. The leaves' job is done - they've put the last of their energy into the bulbs.

Let most of your onion tops fall over by themselves - maybe 80% or 90% of them - then bend over the rest of the tops. Once they're down, leave the bulbs in the ground for another 10 days to two weeks to mature fully. It's not good to leave the onions in the ground for longer than two weeks after the tops die because they become open to organisms that can cause rot in storage, or they might even start growing again.

Pull your onions up on a sunny day if you can, then let them sit in the sun for another day or so to dry (in hot climates this usually takes just a few hours). This drying kills the root system at the bottom of each bulb. The roots will be like little brittle wires when they're dry.

Picking the right day to pull the onions can determine how well the onions will keep. If you harvest them after some rainy weather they'll have a lot more moisture in them and won't dry out as well.


SAVING SEEDS

Seed-producing onions are biennial and it will take two growing seasons to get onion seed. This article explains the seed-to-bulb-to-seed method.

Purchase onion seed and plant as you normally would in the spring. When purchasing seed, only buy open-pollinated or heirloom seeds. Hybrids and other types of seeds are not true seed and your results may be mixed.

You should order and grow enough onions so you have some for eating and some dedicated for seed saving. Onions can cross, so it's best to start with one variety at a time.


Plant your onion seed and do not pick or eat the ones you intend to harvest for seed.

At the end of the growing season when the onion tops are brown, drying and bent over, harvest the onion bulbs. This should be done before the first frost. Do NOT wash the onions, however you can shake the dirt off. Leave the tops on for braiding later.


Choose only the best bulbs for seed saving. Discard or eat others that may not overwinter well.

Spread onions out in a dry location, not touching one another, on a board or screen. If it looks like rain, you will have to move them to a location where they will not get rained on. Try to use a platform that allows air to circulate around the onions well.

Avoid drying the bulbs in direct sunlight in temperatures that are above 75 degrees. This can cause the bulbs to spoil or sunburn. Dry and cure the onions for 10-12 days before braiding.

After curing, you can braid the tops so the onions hang one above the other (not in clumps) and then hang them in a dark, dry storage area until spring.

A barn, potting shed or greenhouse are usually good places to hang them. Protect from the frost and do not store at room temperature. They should keep about 3-6 months and just begin sprouting come planting time in the spring. Sprouting times vary among different varieties.

In spring, when it's time to plant onions again, remove each onion by untwisting the braid and removing the dead, dried up tops. You will probably notice small green sprouts starting at the tops of the bulbs.


Plant the bulbs in your garden. It is interesting to watch the large, tube-like seed stalks grow bigger every day. Then one day you will notice tiny white flowers have formed--the flower head. They are about the size of a softball and remind one of popcorn balls. They are quite dainty and beautiful.

When the seeds form, the onion plant begins to dry. The flower head will begin to darken, turning almost solid black the seeds are dry and ready to harvest.

Using a brown paper bag, bend the onion stalk over and snip the entire flower head into the bag.

Store in a dry area out of direct sunlight to finish drying process. To completely remove the seeds from the flower head, you can shake the bag to allow the loose seeds to drop into bag.

Any remaining seeds can be removed by other techniques; including, threshing, using wire screens to rub them over or stepping on the seed heads to break open the pods.

Screen any debris from your onion seed using seed screens or other screens from home. Nice seed screens can be purchased from some of the seed companies listed in the resource links.

Place onion seed in a sealed glass canning jar or freeze in freezer bags to lengthen the life of the seed. If using the jar method, store in a dry, cool dark area without extreme temperature fluctuations.

Now that you know how to harvest and save onion seed, get involved with other like-minded gardeners who are building their seed banks. One day our country's future may depend on those who have the talent to save seeds and pass this knowledge on to others.


Features
  • Comes in E-Z Lock resealable, reusable triple-layered foil packets
  • Seeds are open pollinated and can be grown, harvested, and replanted endlessly
  • Dried & sealed airtight for long-term storage
  • Nutritional value: An excellent source of calcium, iron, vitamins A, vitamin B1, vitamin B2, vitamin C, and niacin.


Average Review: 5 of 5 | Total Reviews: 46 Write a review.

  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
seeds June 21, 2014
Reviewer: Michael Calvert from Pompano Beach, FL United States  
I received the package and the sealed seed packs as ordered. I can rate it only as far as the process to receive it and that went smoothly. I have this "seed bank" for a time when the society we live in has eroded and food is scarce. I suppose I should open a few of them and test them to make sure the seeds are good, but as in everything there is a level of faith and trust that goes along with life. I am choosing to trust these folks. So I will only write this as a general satisfaction and paste the same on all the others below. So look around and figure out who you are going to trust and buy from them. These probably deserve 5 stars but I will rate them as 4 due to the unknown factor. Be prepared!

Was this review helpful to you?

  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
Great Seeds June 16, 2014
Reviewer: Rick from Oceanside, CA United States  
I love these seeds. I am watching them grow and am glad that I do not have the GMO worries.

Was this review helpful to you?

  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
We shall see May 18, 2014
Reviewer: Joseph Horton from Burns, TN United States  
Started seeds indoors. Have yet to set out in garden but will do in a few days.If they do as well as all the other seeds have, I'll have sweet onions in just a few months

Was this review helpful to you?

  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
Love it all May 8, 2014
Reviewer: Miranda Morgan from Statesville, NC United States  
Fantastic

Was this review helpful to you?

  1 of 1 people found the following review helpful:
 
Couldn't be happier April 30, 2014
Reviewer: Paula from West Virginia  
I planted a flat of these a few weeks ago and every cell except for maybe 6 has sprouted.  Very healthy looking so far.  I just ordered (and received already) more vegetable seeds.  I wanted to see if the seeds would germinate and everything I planted has.  Strawberries, bell peppers, hot peppers, tomatoes and onions so far.  I love the detailed information you all have on saving seeds and planting instructions-  no other website offers the amount of information you have.  I couldn't be happier!

Was this review helpful to you?

View All Customer Reviews
(Your shopping cart is empty)