HOW TO SURVIVE
IN A WORLD GONE MAD



Before we dive in to today's helpful hints, I wanted to talk about what it truly means to live off the grid (OTG).

At its simplest, OTG living means self-sufficiency without reliance on public utilities.

This means that you technically can live off the grid without escaping to the wilderness. It also means you don't have to go back to the "dark age" and give up all the comforts of modern living. As long as you have self-sufficient systems in place, you can enjoy electricity, plumbing and even internet.

However, many people find it easier and simpler to "go back to the land" as they make the transition to OTG life.



The bottom line is, there are many ways and reasons for going OTG. Your definition should be based on what's right for you.



From a strict preparedness standpoint, living OTG in a remote or secluded environment has distinct advantages. If the rest of the world experiences a full-blown crisis, it may not affect your life at all. There's no need to "bug-out" which reduces your chances of getting caught in the chaos.

Yet, living remotely has distinct challenges. Your plans for self-sufficiency need to be effective and sustainable - no one will come to your rescue.

That's why we recommend that anyone who makes this jump to take proper supplies to get through the transition - and if anything goes wrong.

There are two items that come immediately to mind.



ONE: A Plan for Water


Ideally, a remote OTG location will have a source of fresh water.

Hopefully, the water is as pristine as the surroundings you may choose.

Yet, many "tiny things that kill" occur naturally in streams, lakes and ponds. Parasites and bacteria are no joke, especially if you're far from medical help.

That's why we recommend water filtration for every off-the-grid setup.





A few things to look for in an off-the-grid filtration system:



  • Gravity-fed and operated - no electricity required
  • High filtration capacity to last you a long time without needing new filters
  • Filters than can remove a wide range of contaminants at a very high rate


We built our Alexapure Pro precisely for the demands of off-grid living.

The Alexapure Pro never requires electricity.





Each of its up to 4 filters has a capacity to filter up to 5,000 gallons. That's enough to last 2 people several months of off-grid living, assuming it's being used for cooking and cleaning as well. It can last even longer if used just for drinking, assuming each person uses 2 gallons a day.

And finally, we made sure the filters could deal with over 200+ contaminants and reduce or remove them at a rate up to 99.9999%.

Of course, while the Pro is off-the-grid tested, it works just as well on public water supplies or private wells. We over-built it on purpose so that it could be used by all.



TWO: At Least 6 Months of Storable Food


If you're planning on moving to a remote off-the-grid location, chances are you won't be self-sufficient in terms of food for at least 3 months.

That's about how long it would take to harvest a full food crop and is the basis for our estimate. Of course, if you're lucky (and skilled), hunting, fishing and foraging could tide you over.

But do you really want to take that chance?

That's why we recommend anyone heading off the grid take with them at least a 6-month supply of storable food.

You'll have food to eat for the first few months while you become self-sufficient. Then you'll have another few months in case your self-sufficiency plans ever fail (they will at some point).

So, you need both a start-up plan and a backup plan for food when you go off the grid. Cover both of these and your transition and continued OTG living will go much smoother.

Obviously, there are many "must-haves" when going off the grid, but I think we're able to boil it down to the essentials here.

What are your suggestions? We're always open to hearing them.

We hope you found this week's Survival Scout helpful, especially if you're considering going off the grid.

Have a great weekend and stay vigilant out there friends!

In Liberty,

Elizabeth Anderson
MPS Preparedness Advisor



Read Last Week's Survival Scout: Improvisation: When Plans (Inevitably) Fail
or
Read the next Survival Scout: COMING SOON!

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