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White Sweet Spanish Onion Seeds (500mg)
Heirloom White Sweet Spanish Onion Seeds | Grow White Sweet Spanish Onions


 
 



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White Sweet Spanish Onion (500mg):
Best choice for onion rings or salad onion. Flesh is white, mild and tasty with white skin. A good winter keeper! Average: 115 days.

Detailed planting instructions:
Can be direct-seeded, grown from transplants started inside, or from sets -- small bulbs about ½" in diameter grown from seed the previous season. Choose a weed-free, well-drained location. Raised beds are ideal. Onions are good for intercropping with other garden plants, especially early-maturing spring greens. Do not plant where other onion family crops have been grown in the past 3 years. Direct-seeding in the garden may not allow enough time for long-season varieties to mature, but is fine for shorter-season varieties or for scallions - onions harvested before the bulb forms. Direct-seed in spring when the soil reaches 50 F. Plant seed ½ inch deep, ½" apart, in rows 12 to 18" apart. Thin to 4" spacing for large bulbs, 2" spacing for smaller bulbs but higher yields, or 1" spacing for scallions. Start transplants inside about 8 to 10 weeks before last frost date. Plant 4 or 5 seeds in each cell, or seed in flats ½" deep and ½" apart. If tops grow too tall and begin to droop, trim back to about 3" tall with scissors. After hardening off, transplant 2 to 4 weeks before last frost date. Space 4" apart for large bulbs, 2" apart for smaller bulbs, or 1" apart for scallions. From sets: Choose bulbs no larger than ½" in diameter. Large bulbs are more prone to bolting. Plant sets about 1" deep 2 to 4 weeks before last frost date. Space 4" apart for large bulbs or 2" apart for smaller bulbs. Onions have shallow root systems and need consistent moisture and good weed control. Water weekly if weather is dry, and mulch to retain moisture and suppress weeds.

Harvesting:
You can always tell when onions have stopped growing. The leaves will lose their color, weaken at the top of the bulb and flop over. Each year a few new gardeners watch the leaves die and wonder, "What's wrong?" There's nothing wrong; it's Nature's plan. The leaves' job is done - they've put the last of their energy into the bulbs. Let most of your onion tops fall over by themselves - maybe 80% or 90% of them - then bend over the rest of the tops. Once they're down, leave the bulbs in the ground for another 10 days to two weeks to mature fully.

It's not good to leave the onions in the ground for longer than two weeks after the tops die because they become open to organisms that can cause rot in storage, or they might even start growing again. Pull your onions up on a sunny day if you can, then let them sit in the sun for another day or so to dry (in hot climates this usually takes just a few hours). This drying kills the root system at the bottom of each bulb. The roots will be like little brittle wires when they're dry. Picking the right day to pull the onions can determine how well the onions will keep. If you harvest them after some rainy weather they'll have a lot more moisture in them and won't dry out as well.

Saving Seeds:
Seed-producing onions are biennial and it will take two growing seasons to get onion seed. This article explains the seed-to-bulb-to-seed method. Purchase onion seed and plant as you normally would in the spring. When purchasing seed, only buy open-pollinated or heirloom seeds. Hybrids and other types of seeds are not true seed and your results may be mixed. You should order and grow enough onions so you have some for eating and some dedicated for seed saving. Onions can cross, so it's best to start with one variety at a time. Plant your onion seed and do not pick or eat the ones you intend to harvest for seed. At the end of the growing season when the onion tops are brown, drying and bent over, harvest the onion bulbs. This should be done before the first frost. Do NOT wash the onions, however you can shake the dirt off. Leave the tops on for braiding later. Choose only the best bulbs for seed saving. Discard or eat others that may not overwinter well.

Spread onions out in a dry location, not touching one another, on a board or screen. If it looks like rain, you will have to move them to a location where they will not get rained on. Try to use a platform that allows air to circulate around the onions well. Avoid drying the bulbs in direct sunlight in temperatures that are above 75 degrees. This can cause the bulbs to spoil or sunburn. Dry and cure the onions for 10-12 days before braiding. After curing, you can braid the tops so the onions hang one above the other (not in clumps) and then hang them in a dark, dry storage area until spring. A barn, potting shed or greenhouse are usually good places to hang them. Protect from the frost and do not store at room temperature. They should keep about 3-6 months and just begin sprouting come planting time in the spring. Sprouting times vary among different varieties. In spring, when it's time to plant onions again, remove each onion by untwisting the braid and removing the dead, dried up tops. You will probably notice small green sprouts starting at the tops of the bulbs. Plant the bulbs in your garden. It is interesting to watch the large, tube-like seed stalks grow bigger every day. Then one day you will notice tiny white flowers have formed--the flower head. They are about the size of a softball and remind one of popcorn balls. They are quite dainty and beautiful.

When the seeds form, the onion plant begins to dry. The flower head will begin to darken, turning almost solid black the seeds are dry and ready to harvest. Using a brown paper bag, bend the onion stalk over and snip the entire flower head into the bag. Store in a dry area out of direct sunlight to finish drying process. To completely remove the seeds from the flower head, you can shake the bag to allow the loose seeds to drop into bag. Any remaining seeds can be removed by other techniques; including, threshing, using wire screens to rub them over or stepping on the seed heads to break open the pods. Screen any debris from your onion seed using seed screens or other screens from home. Nice seed screens can be purchased from some of the seed companies listed in the resource links.

Place onion seed in a sealed glass canning jar or freeze in freezer bags to lengthen the life of the seed. If using the jar method, store in a dry, cool dark area without extreme temperature fluctuations. Now that you know how to harvest and save onion seed, get involved with other like-minded gardeners who are building their seed banks. One day our country's future may depend on those who have the talent to save seeds and pass this knowledge on to others.
  • Comes in E-Z Lock resealable, reusable triple-layered foil packets
  • Seeds are open pollinated and can be grown, harvested, and replanted endlessly
  • Dried & sealed airtight for long-term storage.

Average Review: 5 of 5 Total Reviews: 28 Write a product review.

  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
White Sweet Spanish Onion Seeds January 30, 2017
Reviewer: Kim Welke from Adrian, MI United States  
Very happy with my order.  Quality products, packaged well, shipped and delivered with surprising speed and accuracy.  Thank you!

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Survival seeds July 28, 2016
Reviewer: John Drake from Julian, NC United States  
I bought these to stash away for the future, I really like that they are good for five years that's a big plus. The packaging is excellent and well made. The price cant be beat either!

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Storage June 9, 2016
Reviewer: Ken Oehrig from Laurens, SC United States  
Long term storage

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Poor Germ Rate (2015) February 4, 2016
Reviewer: The Narrow Way Farm from Ohio  
Ordered White & Yellow Sweet Spanish, and Walla Walla in the fall of 2015 for the 2016 season.  Started them indoors about a month ago for spring planting.  Walla Walla and the Yellow Sweet Spanish came up very well.  The White Spanish had a very low germination rate.

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  0 of 0 people found the following review helpful:
 
A++ September 18, 2015
Reviewer: Jack Baird from Surrey, BC Canada  
Everything arrived quickly and was as described on the webpage despite my Canadian address. Looking forward to getting my garden started this Spring.

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